Wat Tampa In English

What's Happening at Wat Tampa

WatTampaInEnglish is the unofficial web site for Wat Tampa (Wat Mongkolratanaram)

Dogs are welcome at the Sunday Market but please don't bring them onto the deck where the food is served.

The Sunday Market is held every Sunday, come rain or shine, from about 8:30am until 1:00 pm. Some booths may run out of food earlier. Come join us for great food & view in a family friendly setting!

Interested in meditation workshop? Open the Meditation menu and select 2017 Meditation Workshops for a list of dates. Signup forms are available in the Temple. You can also sign-up at the workshop.

Click here to learn more about the Buddha Learning Group. The discussion group meets every Sunday in the main Temple between 11:30am and 12:30pm. On the second Sunday of each month we have a more formal session on Buddhism.

Click here to see some interesting information about Wat Tampa!

Click here to learn more about Wat Tampa. Even frequent visitors may find something interesting on this page! Opens in a new window!

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Is it true that Buddhism are taught to be tolerant of other opinions, beliefs, customs or behaviour different from their own?

Yes, Buddhists are taught to be broadminded but not to believe in anything easily before investigation or proper consideration. Moreover, Buddhists are taught to diffuse the Four Divine States of Mind: loving-kindness, compassion, sympathetic joy and equanimity towards all sentient beings who may be of different nationalities, religions or environments.

 

What are the differences between the two major Schools of Buddhism, i.e. Theravada and Mahayana?

 Theravada means the School which maintains the original teaching of the Buddha. Its root can be traced back to the First Council which was held soon after the Buddha’s passing away; hence it is considered the oldest School. Mahayana came much later, roughly speaking, about 600 years after the Buddha’s time. Vajarayana or Tantrayana developed from the Mahayana approximately 400 years after the beginning of the Mahayana.

  Geographically, Theravada is more prevalent in Sri Lanka, Burma (Myanmar), Thailand, Cambodia and Laos while Mahayana is prevalent in China, Japan, Korea, Vietnam, Nepal and Tibet.

Theoretically both Schools share the fundamental teachings of the Four Noble Truths, etc. but Mahayana developed many more Sutras as elaboration of the original teaching. Among the important Mahayana Sutras are Saddharmapundarika-Sutra, Vimalakirtinirdesa-Sutta, Bhaisajyaguru-Sutra, etc. However, the Vinaya (monastic disciplines) of both Schools remain very similar. The difference in practices is primarily due to different sociological and geographical contexts.
 

What is the meaning of the Buddhist symbol?

 The Buddhist symbol is in the form of a wheel with eight spokes representing the Noble Eightfold Path, which means the way leading to the cessation of suffering. This path consists of the following:


 Right View, Right Motives, Right Speech, Right Action, Right Means of Livelihood, Right Effort, Right Mindfulness, Right Concentration.

 
 This symbol is called “Dhammacakka” or the Wheel of Dhamma and has been adopted as the seal of the World Fellowship of Buddhists. 
 

How and what should the Buddhist believe?

The Buddha is the Enlightened One who discovered the Supreme Truth. He did not force anyone to believe in His teaching with blind faith. The reasonableness of the Dhamma, the Buddha’s teaching, lies in the fact that it welcomes any critical examination at all stages of the path to enlightenment. To understand the nature of all phenomena, insight wisdom must be operative throughout.

 Once the Buddha has instructed the Kalamas, who were inhabitants of Kesaputta, a town in the kingdom of Kosala, on an appropriate attitude towards the religious beliefs. He said
“Do not accept anything on mere hearsay, nor by mere tradition, nor on account of rumours, nor just because it accords with your scriptures, nor by mere suppositions, nor by mere inference, nor by merely considering the appearances,nor merely because it agrees with your preconceived notions, nor merely because it seems acceptable, nor thinking that the recluse is our teacher.”

And then the Buddha had further instructed the Kalamas to consider everything by themselves carefully. He said

“When you yourselves know that these things are bad; these things are these things are blamable; these things are censured by the wise; undertaken and observed; these things lead to harm and ill; abandon them. And in contradiction, when you yourselves know that these things are good; these things are not blamable; these things are praised by the wise; these things, undertaken and observed, lead to benefit and happiness, enter on and abide in them.”
[Kalamasutta]
 

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